Keller Williams Realty,Brevard

DIY - Kitchen Sink Faucet

by Maria "Action" Jackson 04/14/2019

That kitchen sink faucet needed replacing for a while, but between the cost of the new faucet and the cost of paying the hourly rate of the plumber and his helper, it is still the same old faucet. It works—sort-of—at least water comes out. Then, while watching one of those shows (that is either remodeling a house to live in or to flip and make some money), you see them change out the kitchen faucet, and you say to yourself, "I can do that.” 

So, the adventure begins.

On the surface, changing out a faucet does not seem like such a challenging project. However, if you are not doing plumbing on a regular basis, it can get more complicated. The first step is that you have to buy the faucet you want that will look good. That seems simple enough, but there are holes already drilled in the sink or the countertop, so you must get a faucet that will fit those. There are two ways to size the holes: either remove the old fixture or get under the sink to measure the distance between the holes. (This is particularly important if this is an older home.) 

Now to do the work.

Removing the faucet requires crawling under the sink. 

  • First, remove all of that stuff stored under there.
  • Turn off the hot and cold water. If there are no valves under the sink, you need to find the master valve for the house. (If this is the situation, you might decide to install valves while you’re at it, but remember, you are not a plumber, so that might be biting off more than you can chew.)
  • Now you find that the drain pipes are in your way of trying to get under the sink to reach the backside. So, you decide to remove them to get around under there. Seems logical right? Unfortunately, you find that someone else that is not a plumber replaced those drain lines and did not put them back correctly so now you are going to have to replace those.
  • Back to the faucet you finally get the water lines removed and the nuts holding the faucet to the sink. (They're corroded—apparently, there had been a leak at some point). 

Following the instructions that came with the faucet, you get it attached to the sink, and it looks GREAT! Unfortunately, you go to connect the waterlines, and the ends do not match the faucet. So, you remove the waterlines from the inlet valve and head to the DIY store to find new lines that will fit. You also remember to take all of that drain pipe with you because you are going to need to replace it and make it fit correctly.

Wrap it up!

Now you have the new parts you can get the water attached and the drain pipes reconnected. The drain pipes look a lot different, but they work, and they do not leak. Congratulations to you! 

You have finally replaced that old faucet. It looks good, but bummer it took you all Saturday morning and then some. Maybe you should have paid that plumber for an hour. You could have done something more fun. Plumbing is one of those DIY things that when you do not do it all of the time, you NEVER have the correct pieces and you end up making several trips to the store. You are not alone.

The choice is yours: spend money or spend time. DIY can be satisfying or frustrating, so remember to start a project with your eyes open to what could be involved. Good luck! 

For a referral to a qualified plumber, check with your real estate professional.

About the Author
Author

Maria "Action" Jackson

Maria Jackson grew up in Germany, but the first time she saw Cocoa Beach’s surf and sand, she knew she was home. That date was December 24, 1983, and although she goes back to Germany to visit often, she has never regretted her decision to stay here permanently.

Maria worked in several fields over the next few years, but they all had some link to the real estate industry.  She finally realized that was the career she was looking for and in 2004 she obtained her real estate license.  In 2019 she joined Keller Williams (KW). “I’m pretty tech savvy,” she says, “and I liked that the KW app is so up to date with the latest in marketing tools and internet sales.  I love using Social Media including Facebook, Twitter and the DSRE app.  I believe it’s important to utilize every tool at my disposal to market my customer’s listings.” Maria recently closed on a $860,000 home and credits the marketing tools to her success.

She wakes up each morning excited about what the day will bring. “Every day is a new day, a new client, a new listing.  I love the variety of learning something new every day. I’m a really good communicator and even better at being able to see the whole picture, even when my client doesn’t. Sometimes clients think they want one thing but I can point something out to them and they will do a complete reversal. It’s my job to point out all the details that sometimes they don’t see.”

Maria, who is fluent in English and German, has worked extensively with local and international investors. Although she lives in the charming Canaveral Groves community, she manages listings and transactions throughout all of Brevard County.

Maria and her husband have three grown daughters and two grandsons. They love family get-togethers and spend as much time on the water as possible. Maria devotes her volunteer time at a local elementary school and has helped host fundraising benefits for local residents in need.

Maria’s feelings haven’t changed since that first day she set eyes on the beach; she continues her love affair with Cocoa Beach and the surrounding area and knows that she made the right decision in calling this new place home all those years ago.